Deleting folders that refuse to be deleted…

Sometimes when you want to delete a folder in windows you get a very useful message “Could not find this item… this is no longer located in …”, (yes, the very item you just tried to delete).

So after a bit of cursing, making sure that you are indeed the admin of this box, praying to the windows gods you realise that maybe Windows Explorer is at fault.

Not to worry you think, you open up a cmd line console and navigate to the parent of the offending folder.

And like a true hacker you type

“rd c:\my\bad\folder”

only to be told once again, “The system cannot find the file specified.”

At this point your realise that the folder has spaces… so you think “no problem, I will quote the folder” and you now type

‘rd “c:\my\bad\folder “‘

with the correct number of spaces in the folder name.

Long story short… you cannot do that.

You cannot rename the folder, (I know you will try anyway, but you can’t)

So you Googled for a solution and here you are…

what you need to do is tell the command line to not trim the folder name and to do that, you have to add “\?\” in front, so now you type

‘rd /s /q “\\?\c:\my\bad\folder “‘

Complete with the extra spaces and so on… (I added the /s and /q flags because you forgot that the directory is not empty)

Debug Google test with Eclipse

You can add the google test library to Eclipse so you can compile the code, but you might want to actually build the whole thing at once without having to link libraries and whatever.

Of course this is possible as the full code is given to you…

  • Go to the Google Test Github project and download the latest release.
  • Unpack it whereever you want, and, of course make note of the project.
    We will call that folder <gfolder>
  • You then need to include the Google test file path, in eclipse,
    • The root of Google folder, “C/C++ build > Settings > Includes > Add include path” for <gfolder>
    • The include folder, “C/C++ build > Settings > Includes > Add include path” for <gfolder>, where the source files are included.

Then in you main( … ){ … } where you would normally include #include “gtest/gtest.h” or #include <gtest/gtest.h> add “#include “src/gtest-all.cc””

#include “src/gtest-all.cc”
#include “gtest/gtest.h”

int main(int argc, char** argv)
{
printf(“Running main() from gtest_main.cc\n”);
::testing::InitGoogleTest(&argc, argv);
return RUN_ALL_TESTS();
}

vs2015/2013 – Cannot see unit tests in Test Explorer window

If have some unitests in Visual Studio 2015 or 2013 but you cannot see them in your “Test Explorer window”

If you look in your output window, (under “Show output from:” > “test)

An exception was thrown while initializing part “Microsoft.VisualStudio.TestWindow.UI.TestWindowToolWindowControl”.

The solution is just to delete the VS2013/VS2015 cache folder, located either in

%LOCALAPPDATA%\Microsoft\VisualStudio\12.0\ComponentModelCache

For VS2013, or

%LOCALAPPDATA%\Microsoft\VisualStudio\14.0\ComponentModelCache

For VS2015

Git and submodule

Sometimes things get a little out of sync in your submodule folder, your ‘root’ project sometimes report something like

\ In the git branch
[branch = +0 ~1 -0 !]>

Or even  something along the lines of

\ In the submodule folder
[(7cd98ce...)]>

Showing that you are no longer on the correct branch, (for the submodule).

One one way to clean it all up is to do.

\ In the submodule folder
git checkout master
git pull
git push origin HEAD:master
git checkout master

Assuming that you have no other changes to commit

\ In the root folder
git clean -fd
git pull
git submodule update --init --recursive
git submodule update

And that should clear everything

Powershell cheatsheet for C++/C#

This is just a small post to help my ageing memory remember where things are located.

  • Powershell C#
    Locate the dll, System.Management.Automation.dll, and add it to your project, (or add it via Nuget).

    • See this blog for a good introduction on creating a project, (works for vs2015).
  • Check what version is installed
    • According to the official site you need to check the registry
      HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\PowerShell\1
      or
      HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\PowerShell\3
      And check that the value Install is set to ‘1’.
  • Debuging
    • The external program is C:\Windows\System32\WindowsPowerShell\v1.0\powershell.exe
    • But the actual location is:
      • Powershell 1: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\PowerShell\1\PowerShellEngine\{ApplicationBase}
      • Powershell 3:HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\PowerShell\3\PowerShellEngine\{ApplicationBase}
    • Launching from debuger:
      • For a script:
        PowerShell -Command “& {.\myscript.ps1}” or
        PowerShell -File “.\myscript.ps1”
      • For a CmdLet/Module:
        -noexit -command “&{ import-module .\AMPowerShellCmdLets.dll -Verbose}”
  • Some links

Using Github from command line

This assumes that you have all the permissions needed to access your repo, (passwords and so on).

Start Git Shell and navigate to your local repo.

Create a branch

git checkout -b <branch-name>
git push <remote-name> <branch-name>

In the case of github the remote name is ‘origin’

Source

Add your changes to the branch

git add .

The ‘.’ means ‘everything’ that was changed.

You can use ‘status’ to check what needs to be staged, (or what has been staged).

git status

Commit branch

git commit -m "You message here"

Push branch
The first time you need to tell where you are pushing this to.

git push --set-upstream <remote-name> <branch-name>

The afterwards you just need to do…

git push

Delete your branch

To remotely delete it

git push <remote-name> --delete <branch-name>

To locally delete it


git branch --delete <branch-name>

Source

How to compare multiple folders with BeyondCompare 4 and Piger

Why?

In some cases you might often need to compare folders using beyond compare and using a Piger command might just do the trick.

The problem is that you might want to open/compare more than one folder at a time, so here is how to do it.

How

First of all, go and download your version of Beyond compare and get the latest version of Piger.

Open a blank file with your favourite editor, we will create a LUA file in this case.

— the path to the BC4 exe.
local bCompare = [[%ProgramFiles%\Beyond Compare 4\BCompare.exe]];

— compare folder A and folder B
am_execute( bCompare, [[/filters=”-bin\;-*.exe” “c:\folderA” “c:\folderB”]]);

— also compare folder X and folder Y
am_execute( bCompare, [[/filters=”-lib\;-*.user” “c:\folderX” “c:\folderY”]]);

The part “/filter=” contains the files you want to filter out, in the first example, the folder(s) “bin\” will be filtered out as well as files with the executable extension, (*.exe).

Finally, the 2 folders are listed one after the other, I suggest that you add quotes around them, especially if they have spaces, (but do it anyway).

Admin or not?

You might not access to all the folders, (for whatever reason), but you might have access as an admin, so, when in doubt, set the admin flag to true, this might help a little.

But it is not generally needed…

am_execute( bCompare, [[/filters=”-lib” “c:\X” “c:\Y”]], true);

String in LUA

A small note about the way I escaped the strings in my example.

normally special characters are ‘escaped’ in LUA, (characters like quotes and so on).

local x = “This is how you do it, \”normally\””

but you can use double square brackets to make your life slightly easier, (and more importantly, easier to read).

local x = [[This is how you do it, “normally”]]

See Lua String for more info.

Finally

Save you file with whatever command you want to call it, for example “compare.lua”, make sure that it has the “.lua” extension.

Move the file to your command folder, ( located in “%appdata%\MyOddWeb\ActionMonitor\RootCommands\” by default).

Reload Piger, (use the command “this.reload”).

And your new command should now appear.